Professional Secrets for Finding Treasure at Garage Sales

Shannon Quinn - June 21, 2021
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Always do research before you get rid of grandma’s bone china. Credit: Shutterstock

2. Bone China

Fine Bone China is different from your average porcelain. It’s made with bone ash, and has a semi-translucent quality if you hold it up to the sun. If you ever find a piece like this when browsing garage sales, you’re almost guaranteed to be able to sell each piece for $100. Always check the bottom for marks. A golden crown usually indicates that it came from England. British Bone China tends to be the most valuable.

Other types of china are valuable, as well. Many of the ultra-expensive pieces are European. But plenty of American brands, like Lenox, sell for decent amounts of money on eBay too. Lenox has patterns that come out for a limited time. So if someone breaks a piece, they often go online to find replacements. Because of this, there is a huge market for selling older china patterns. For example, I recently bought my mom a replacement Lenox mug, and I had to pay $40 just for the one piece. For all I know, this person may have found it for $1 at a yard sale. However, be warned. If you plan to sell anything breakable like china, make sure you pack it very well!

Some people collect vintage ephemera. Credit: Shutterstock

1. Papers

Collectible papers, also known as “ephemera” are bought for all kinds of reasons. Some people like to see newspaper stories of historic value, postcards of their hometown, and so much more. However, please don’t get into the habit of collecting every single paper you find. (That’s called hoarding.) 

Sometimes, you just might hit the jackpot. One man found a paper stock certificate from 1917 of an oil company, which merged with Coca-Cola. (Weird combo, but okay.) The man paid just $5, and found out later that it was now worth $130 million!

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