How to Decorate Your Home With the Cottagecore Aesthetic

Shannon Quinn - November 8, 2020
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Buying local helps businesses, and it often tastes better. Credit: Shutterstock

7. Shop From Your Local Farmers, Bakers, and Butchers

Years ago, there were no supermarkets. People had to grow their own food, barter, or buy goods from other people in their area. Butchers, bakers, and farmers did the work to supply so that other people could go about their normal lives. Nowadays, people take it for granted that they can go to Walmart and get everything they need right in front of them. Personally, I started shopping at two of my local farmer’s markets. I found that the produce is a lot cheaper, and yet it tastes ten times better than what I find in a grocery store. In my local area, there is also a meat wholesaler, and a bakery that makes some of the best bread I’ve ever tasted. Obviously, you might not have access to these kinds of places, depending on where you live.

There’s nothing better than curling up with a knitted blanket. Credit: Shutterstock

6. Knit Blankets and Other Knitted Things

Long ago, you couldn’t just go to the mall when you wanted to buy new clothes. People made their clothing by hand, and the same went with blankets, gloves, scarves, and more. Fans of cottagecore are learning how to knit and crochet like their ancestors. Not everyone has the time, skills, and patience to knit an entire blanket. But if you’re still looking for the same look, I recommend finding an artist on Etsy who is selling their stuff. You can also ask your grandma, or browse local thrift stores for second hand knitted goods. One time, I went to an estate sale and purchased a huge pink blanket that was knit by the family’s great great grandmother, and I gladly paid the $12 asking price. These types of blankets might not be everyone’s taste. But one person’s trash just might be cottagecore treasure. 

Handmade ceramics help give your home a vintage vibe. Credit: Shutterstock

5. Start Using Hand Made Ceramics in the Kitchen

Long ago, people purchased ceramics like mugs, bowls, and pitchers from local artisans. Or, they took the time to make their own pottery from mud they found in the earth. Today, we have mass-produced ceramics that are easily found at most stores. Instead of buying your products from places like Ikea, consider finding a ceramic artist on Etsy, or a local craft show. Personally, I find a lot of handmade ceramics from a local cafe that doubles as an artist co-op, as well as a glass museum and art center.  Some towns also have ceramic studios where you can stop by and make something yourself. Lastly, you could buy some ceramic tools online, and try it out at home.

This old kitchen has a cottagecore vibe. Credit: Shutterstock

4. Buy Vintage Kitchen Appliances

One great way to feel like you’ve gone back in time is to start using vintage kitchen appliances. People have been cooking for a very long time, and tools have stayed relatively the same long before the existence of microwaves and toaster ovens. Cast iron pans, copper pots, and wooden rolling pins have been around for over 100 years, and they still work just as well as they did in the olden days. Start browsing thrift stores, eBay, or estate sales to find some vintage items to use around your kitchen. Some people, like YouTuber Michael Petherick, have even gone so far as to restore a vintage Aga oven for his gardener’s cottage remodel. If you want the vintage vibe, but you still prefer modern conveniences, take a look at Smeg products. They’re made in Italy, and still have the same style from 1948.

Hanging your clothes saves energy, and it’s very satisfying. Credit: Shutterstock

3. Hang Your Laundry Outside

The idea of Cottagecore is to feel like you’ve gone back to simpler times. One way to achieve that is to start hanging your clothes outside on sunny days in the spring and summer. Here in the United States, most people use a washing machine and dryer. But in most European countries, people don’t own a dryer, so it’s common for people to hang their clothes outside. Several months ago, I rented a cottage in England, and it didn’t have a dryer. I got used to hanging my clothes to dry in the garden, instead. After about a week, the cottage began to smell almost identical to my grandmother’s house. It really does feel nostalgic, simple, and satisfying to hang your clothes. When I got home to America, I bought a laundry drying rack so I could continue to do this in the summer. 

Cooking is a valuable skill. Credit: Shutterstock

2. Start Cooking Your Own Meals

Part of the cottagecore dream is waking up with the sun and making your own breakfast. Some people dream of cooking and living off the land, and nothing else. So the advice to cook on your own might be obvious for a lot of you who are now eating at home during lockdown. However, one of the best ways to get in touch with your ancestors is to start cooking from home. Instead of going through the drive-thru of McDonald’s, start making eggs with toast and jam in your own kitchen. On Tik Tok, a lot of people in the Cottagecore community experiment with new recipes that they find. Try doing this on your own, and you just might find that you enjoy cooking. As an added bonus, you could focus on recipes that were made in the olden days. 

Rent a real cottage on AirBnB. Credit: Shutterstock

1. Visit a Real Country Cottage For Inspiration

Last but not least, you should visit a real life cottage if you want to model your home after cottagecore. Not everyone has access to an old country cottage, but you never know if you actually want the lifestyle until you try. There are a lot of museums and historical societies that try to preserve the integrity of older buildings in every state. You can also rent an Airbnb at a cottage that’s close to you. Personally, I was able to rent English cottage for an entire month before travel restrictions were in place. While I stayed there, I was inspired by how different the lifestyle was in the UK compared to the United States. It’s one thing to look through Pinterest or watch TV shows. But that can’t replace actually going somewhere in person, living there, and really experiencing what it’s like. 

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