The Crazy Life of Extreme Couponers

Trista - November 8, 2021
Share
Shutterstock

6. The History of Extreme Couponing

You may be wondering what started this whole craze. Yes, the idea of saving money has been around since, well, money was invented. However, the concept of couponing hasn’t been around for that long. Extreme couponing started as an article mentioned in The Wall Street Journal in March 2010 about an extreme sport that combined shopping with couponing to save as much money as possible while buying the most groceries.

TLC then started a TV show entitled Extreme Couponing about shoppers who make very extensive use of coupons. Despite mixed reception from critics, the show was renewed for a second, third, fourth, and fifth season. For many, it could be viewed as a guilty pleasure like many reality TV shows. Mostly the show has received regular criticism from consumer and coupon blogs about coupon misuse, such as using coupons for incorrect items, the use of counterfeit coupons, and encouraging compulsive hoarding.

Shutterstock

5. Controversial Fake Deals For Couponers

Numerous shows have been rumored to have gone along with whatever deals the show needed them to be featured. Many examples where the profiled “extreme couponers” received massive discounts showed that, in reality, their haul would not have been as fruitful. The store doubled every shopper’s coupon in one particularly badly-scripted shopping haul, but their normal policy was very far from that. The outcry was so significant that they had to post a statement to their Facebook in an attempt to mollify their outrage. In reality, most grocery stores will not double coupons or restrict how many coupons can be combined; sometimes, sales items cannot be used with a coupon. Almost all stores will have some type of policy about their coupons, sales, and the number of coupons that can be used. It is a fact that tends to be forgotten on these extreme couponing shows.

The original special came out to much controversy and pushed the boundaries of acceptable and even legal coupon usage. The first four participants of the pilot didn’t know what they were getting into. It was initially pitched to them as a “What Not to Wear” for coupons – essentially an educational how-to guide on saving money after being severely hit by a recession. Instead, it turned into a spectacle of ‘who can push this the furthest,” much to the disappointment of the participants. Later, participants understood the assignment and played into the “kooky spendthrift” stereotype. However, many of them went on record, later on, to say it was essentially a persona and that they were not true to their actual shopping habits on the show. 

Shutterstock

4. Extreme Couponing Doesn’t Tell You How Long it Takes to Become a Pro

The show usually features people who have become experts at couponing, but it doesn’t tell you how long they had to work to become proficient. For example, extreme couponer Stacy Fout said that she only had recently reduced her prep time to four to six hours after working at it for six whole years! She added that if you aren’t strategic, you could spend more gas money than you save.

Besides, the show was often unrealistic in its shopping portrayals. The shopping on the show is pretty near impossible to do in reality. Stores can close down for filming or reduce the number of other shoppers, reserve a special aisle for checkout, and sometimes even allow the TV couponer to buy pre-order what they would need to have it available in advance. The real world doesn’t work like that! 

Shutterstock

3. Some Stores Regret Filming Extreme Couponing

One show even stated that they made a “poor decision by participating,” and many stores felt like they struggled after featuring in the show. Unfortunately, the show made it seem like stores have no couponing policies, which can be quite unrealistic and lead to serious confusion for inexperienced couponers. Then, there were reports of coupon theft after the show! And, this crime really grew.

The show touted that you could only save money if you had enough coupons, which undoubtedly led misguided (and criminal) couponers to steal newspapers! Some reactions were so intense that newspapers even noticed a rise in coupon theft, specifically from newspapers that held the highest coupon value. Even though there were only five seasons of the show, you can still catch reruns on the air today, and as you know now, there were intensely split reactions as a result of the show.

Shutterstock

2. Claims of Scripted Shows About Couponers

One former participant explained that their entire show was entirely scripted and not just removing inappropriate phrases, for example. “The entire show is scripted,” they said. “The producer handed us coupons to give to the store and told us what to say,” they went on. Disappointing, but not unheard of considering the world of reality TV. Joanie Demer, a participant on the show and the co-founder of The Krazy Coupon Lady website, was featured on several media appearances, which is how Extreme Couponing producers found her.

In her episode, she bought four carts worth of groceries, stating, “it was completely insane!” She explained that it took months of planning, even writing to manufacturers to request coupons for discounts and free products. She even added a disclaimer: “It’s fun to flex your muscles and get to say, ‘look what I can do.’ That’s cool, and it made for great TV, but that was in no way a realistic portrayal of the amount of money that you can save on any given week couponing.”

Shutterstock

1. What Has Changed About Couponing?

Some changes, like more restrictive coupon policies, were direct results of the show, while others were due to the available technologies. Digital coupons and cash-back or rebate apps are just a few examples of new technologies that have revolutionized the couponing world. A decade ago, a show about spending over forty hours a week clipping and organizing coupons to save hundreds or even thousands of dollars was a see-it-to-believe-it phenomenon. As the series progressed, the shopping trips became more and more outrageous as each of the participants in the episode needed to outdo the previous shoppers. 

Yes, couponing has changed in many ways due to the show. However, some of the biggest changes aren’t related to the show at all. You may not be able to use 20 coupons and get 73 free mustard bottles today, but you can still stack coupons and save a good amount of money, then use a cash-back app for additional rebates after the fact. Today, there is a newer generation of couponers that may have never even seen Extreme Couponers. Couponing today is more about strategically spending a little bit of extra time on saving money. However, there will always be a subset of die-hard couponers that will walk around with their clipped coupons in organizers! 

Advertisement